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Academic Board's Definitions Policy

This is the current version of this document. To view historic versions of this document click the link in the main navigation (grey) bar above or contact policies@scu.edu.au for versions that expired pre August 2012.

Section 1 - Preamble

(1) This Policy replaces the Policy Definitions information contained at the beginning of the Academic Policy (December 2010). The purpose of this Policy is to set out the definitions approved by the Academic Board for use across various University documents including, but not limited to, policies approved by the Academic Board.

Section 2 - Policy Statement

(2) The definitions set out in this Policy shall apply wherever they are referenced by another document of the University. Where referenced these definitions shall be taken to apply in whole unless explicitly stated otherwise in the referencing document. Where a definition is excluded by way of an explicit exemption, and an alternative definition is adopted, this will be made clear in the referencing document.

Section 3 - Definitions

(3) The definitions established and approved by the Academic Board are as follows:

  1. Academic Advisory Committee - Academic Advisory Committees are normally established by Schools. They act as advisory committees for courses, suites of courses, or Schools. Their role is to provide informed advice regarding academic and research matters to the relevant Head of School. Membership normally consists of student, internal and external representation.
  2. Academic integrity - The application of the belief that honesty is at the core of exemplary scholarship. It is embodied in the scrupulous acknowledgment of the work of others in research, academic activities, in other creative endeavours and in the production and reproduction of knowledge. It concerns adherence to the relevant legislation, and to the rules, policies, regulations, procedures, guidelines, codes of practice and accepted ethical practice of the University, academic disciplines and professional practice.
  3. Academic misconduct -
    1. The behaviour that contravenes the values of academic integrity. It includes, but is not limited to, plagiarism, collusion, cheating and fraud.
    2. Academic misconduct is taken to be deliberate when a person has had the opportunity to gain an understanding of the practice of academic integrity before the misconduct has occurred.
    3. Academic misconduct is taken to be inadvertent when the person has not had the opportunity to gain an understanding of the practice of academic integrity.
  4. Administrative and learning support - Administrative and learning support includes the following areas of the University:
    1. the Library;
    2. Centre for Teaching and Learning;
    3. Information Technology;
    4. Student Services;
    5. Student Support Centre;
    6. Academic Skills; and
    7. Community and Corporate Relations.
  5. Advanced Standing - is a form of credit for any previous learning (AQF 2013, p.92). Advanced standing is granted on the basis of previous, successfully completed studies or other recognised prior learning, and is expressed as specified or unspecified credit points towards the completion of an award;
  6. Advanced Standing Precedent - means an advanced standing outcome that is made publicly available to increase the transparency of the University's advanced standing decisions;
  7. Annual Course Report - The Annual Course Report is part of the course review process. It is a report compiled annually by the Course Coordinator and is based on data from the MIS and information from the Unit Reports. (As further described in the Annual Course Report Guidelines )
  8. Approval and implementation timetable - This timetable is to be included in the New Course Concept Proposal, Course Accreditation Submission and Course Change Submission. It should track the approval and implementation processes of a course proposal, e.g. approval by School/College Board; development of study materials; intake of first cohort of students.
  9. Articulation Arrangements - enable students to progress from a completed qualification to another with admission and/or credit in a defined qualification pathway' (AQF, 2013, p.92);
  10. Assessment, formative - Formative assessment encompasses all those developmental student activities that occur during a teaching period upon which students receive feedback but do not count towards a final grade.
  11. Assessment, summative - Summative assessment encompasses all those student activities that occur during a teaching period which are marked and form part of a student's final grade.
  12. Attrition -
    1. ASCED attrition is calculated by comparing the number of students enrolled in a year with the number of students enrolled in the following year and subtracting the number of students who have graduated.
    2. The ASCED definition for institutional attrition currently stands as:
      AR = (E1 — E2 — G) / E1
      Where
      AR is attrition rate
      E1 is enrolments (in award courses) at Census date year 1
      E2 is enrolments from E1 at Census date year 2
      G is graduates from E1 cohort
      • This includes leave of absence, sanctions and cancellations.
      • The SCU Management Information System can, however, calculate internal course attrition.
  13. Authentic assessment - As far as is practicable student assessment tasks shall relate to real life situations in the workplace, clinic, School/College or profession to ensure their authenticity.
  14. Award - A qualification achieved following successful completion of an accredited course.
  15. Benchmarking - A process whereby the University or parts of the University compare themselves with other institutions or parts of other institutions. This can be extensive or on a minor scale.
  16. Caution - If a student is taken to have committed academic misconduct 'inadvertently' and of a 'large extent' a 'caution' is issued to the student. A caution includes an opportunity to learn about academic integrity, a warning about the consequences of academic misconduct, how to avoid academic misconduct and a clear message about penalties should the student be found to have committed academic misconduct again.
  17. Cheating - Improper conduct in examinations or other assessment tasks. It includes, but is not limited to taking unauthorised study material and aids into an examination room, copying from another student; sitting an examination for another student; 'recycling' work that has been prepared for one unit by presenting it as original work for another unit or re-presenting work previously submitted for an incomplete or failed unit unless specific permission is given and/or the assignment is re-worked; presenting a false reference list.
  18. Collusion - A type of plagiarism that includes, but is not limited to presenting the product of unauthorised collaboration to an examiner as independent work. Collusion also occurs when a person knowingly allows his or her work to be copied and passed off as the work of another person.
  19. Commendations, Recommendations and Affirmations - Based on AUQA definitions as detailed in AUQA Report of an Audit of Southern Cross University, July 2008:
    1. commendations:
      • refers to the achievement of a stated goal, or to some plan or activity that has led to, or appears likely to lead to, the achievement of a stated goal, and which in the opinion of the reviewer is particularly significant
    2. recommendations:
      • refers to an area in need of attention, whether in respect of approach, deployment or results, which in the reviewer's opinion is particularly significant
    3. affirmations:
      • where such matters have already been identified by the School, with evidence, they are termed 'affirmations'
  20. Community - In the context of this policy community is defined as groups of individuals or organisations that students may engage with as graduates. They include communities of professionals, communities of employees, constituents and a broad range of communities of interest. They range from a community of peers (in whatever form that may take) to a community of global citizens.
  21. Community Engaged Learning (CEL) - Community Engaged Learning is the term used at Southern Cross University to describe contextualised experiential learning for students across a range of communities. The activity is structured, intentional and recognised by the University in order to secure directed learning outcomes for the community and the student that are both transferable and relevant. It is underpinned by the principle of experiential learning.
  22. Community engagement - Community engagement describes the collaboration between Southern Cross University and its larger community (local, regional, national and international) for the mutual benefit of the community and SCU teaching, learning and research.
  23. Consecutive study periods - Study periods where a student is not enrolled are not taken into consideration when determining consecutive study periods. For example, where a student is enrolled in first trimester and third trimester only, these trimesters are considered to be consecutive study periods. Where a student is enrolled in Second Semester 2008 and Second Semester 2009 only, these semesters are considered to be consecutive study periods.
  24. Constructive alignment - A well-designed unit hinges on a close alignment between its essential elements: objectives, graduate attributes, assessment, content, teaching and learning strategies.
  25. Counselling - If a student is taken to have committed academic misconduct 'inadvertently' and of a 'small extent' an element of the process is to 'counsel' the student about the consequences of academic misconduct in conjunction with providing an opportunity for the student to learn about academic integrity and how to avoid academic misconduct.
  26. Course - An approved plan of study with specific award rules leading to an award of the University.
  27. Course Accreditation Submission
    1. The Course Accreditation Submission is written by the Course Development Team and submitted to the School/College Board for recommendation to the DVC and Academic Board.
    2. The Submission is the primary document that gives the details of the content of the proposed new course and related issues and must contain all the information as specified in the Course Accreditation Submission Template and Course Accreditation Submission Guidelines .
    3. If the course is to be a post graduate research degree (Masters by Thesis or Professional Doctorate), then the Secretary of Academic Board will forward the submission to the Research & Research Training Advisory Committee (RRTAC) for recommendation to Academic Board.
  28. Course Change Submission
    1. A Course Change Submission is required when a change is to be made to an existing course. There are two types of Course Change submission, Major or Minor.
    2. A Course Change submission must normally be approved before the changed course is to be offered. In other words, for the following year's new student intake as well as the continuing student cohort(s), Academic Board approval must occur before the June meeting of Academic Board in the previous year to allow effective implementation time.
    3. The Course Change Submission is written by the Course Coordinator, or delegate, of the course concerned and submitted to the School/College/ Board for forwarding to the Secretary of Academic Board.
    4. The Chair of the Programs Committee may refer the proposal to Academic Board if there are any changes they feel need to be reviewed by the Board. Otherwise changes are approved at Programs Committee and noted by Academic Board.
    5. If the course affected is a post graduate research degree (Masters by Thesis or Professional Doctorate), then the Secretary of Academic Board will forward the submission to the Higher Degrees Research Committee for recommendation to Academic Board.
    6. The Submission is the primary document that gives the details of the changes to the course content and related issues and must contain all the information as specified in the Major Course Change Submission Template , Minor Course Change Submission Template and Major Course Change Submission Guidelines .
    7. A major course change requiring a Major Course Change submission:
      • Change of course name*
      • A change that significantly alters the nature of the course, including a substantial change to the aims of a course
      • A change that significantly alters the entry requirements* or exit points in a course
      • Addition or deletion of more than one core unit in a course
      • The addition or deletion of more than one core unit in a major
      • A change that impacts significantly on other school/college courses
      • Offering a course in a language other than English
      • Addition or deletion of a major
      • A change to the award rules to give effect to a major change
      • A change which will have a significant and substantial impact on continuing students

        * Normally written advice will be required to be provided to Student Services (includes Tertiary Admission Centres) and Marketing and Media 14 months prior to the year of first offering.
    8. A minor course change requiring a Minor Course Change submission:
      • Unit name change
      • Change to the aims of the course that are not substantial
      • A change to correct an error in award rules
      • Changes to elective units in the schedule of units (including electives in a major) that do not have a substantial impact on another school
      • Changes to the Field of Education (unit or course)
      • Unit statement changes that have to go to Programs Committee unless the changes have a substantial impact on a course or on another school
      • A change to the award rules to give effect to a minor change
      • A change to the mode of offering of a course
      • A change to the location of a course if it involves offshore delivery; a collaboration; or partner institution
      • The addition of a course in a new location*
      • Addition or deletion of one core unit in a course
      • Any change where the Chair of Programs Committee after consultation with the Chair of Academic Board has decided the change, even if it technically meets the definition of a major change, in the circumstances, is not such as to warrant a major course change submission.

        * Following approval by a School/College Board, a minor course change submission requesting the addition of a course in a new location at a Southern Cross University campus in Australia may be submitted directly to the Deputy Vice Chancellor for consideration. The Deputy Vice Chancellor following consultation with the Chair of Academic Board and Student Services will consider minor course change requests and may require the submission of a Resource Impact Statement.
  29. Course Development Team
    1. The Course Development Team will be formed by the School/College/College and approved by the DVC. Changes to the Course Development Team must be approved by the DVC.
    2. Information regarding the Course Development Team membership will form part of the New Course Concept Proposal. Once the New Course Concept Proposal has been approved the School/College/College will form a Course Development Team. As a minimum requirement the Course Development Team is normally to include at least:
      • Course Convenor — Chair — (who may not be the same person as the Course Coordinator)
      • one person external to the University who is active in the profession/industry or discipline a member of another university
      • at least one person from another Faculty OR
      • a representative from all Faculties and School/Colleges/Colleges which have an interest in the area of the proposed course or who have expertise in areas which are related to the proposed course
      • a curriculum developer from the Teaching and Learning Centre
      • relevant School/College/College Administrative Officer, or equivalent, to facilitate the course planning and approval process
    3. The Team is responsible for consulting widely and appropriately and for writing the Course Accreditation Submission.
  30. Course Experience Questionnaire (CEQ) ratings - The CEQ is a national instrument for gauging graduate satisfaction with their university experience.
  31. Course Performance Reports
    1. Individual Course Performance Report - All Locations
    2. This MIS report provides an overall snapshot of how a particular course is performing in the chosen year across all locations with respect to demand, enrolments, student profile, performance, progress and retention, course satisfaction and graduate outcome Individual Course Performance Report - By Location.
    3. This MIS report provides an overall snapshot of how a particular course is performing in the chosen year and location with respect to demand, enrolments, student profile, performance, progress and retention, course satisfaction and graduate outcomes.
  32. Course Removal Submission
    1. A Course Removal Submission is required when an existing course is to be removed from the offerings of the University. A Head of School/College, Executive Dean, DVC or the Vice Chancellor may initiate a course removal process.
    2. Decisions to withdraw undergraduate courses should normally be made 12 months ahead of the relevant admission period to facilitate the removal of the course from marketing materials such as the QTAC and UAC Guides, recruitment brochures for domestic and international students and the University Handbook. Therefore the process should commence well in advance of this.
    3. There may be a number of different reasons for withdrawing a course. The decision to withdraw a course should be made in the context of the School/College, Faculty and University strategic priorities and the Academic Plan. The implications of a course removal, including the impact on other courses and the redeployment of resources need to be considered.
    4. Where the proposal has come from a Head of School/College or Executive Dean, the School/College Board shall be responsible for recommending the removal of a course. It shall then for forwarded for consideration by Council through the Academic Board.
    5. Where the proposal comes from the DVC or Vice Chancellor the Submission will go directly to Programs Committee for noting and forwarding to Academic Board and Council.
    6. The Submission must give a rationale for the removal of the course and detail transitional arrangements for existing students and impact it may have on other courses by the University. It must contain all the information as specified in Course Removal Submission Template and Course Removal Submission Guidelines .
  33. Course Review - A Course Review is the five yearly review of all courses in a School. The review is conducted by an external expert selected by the Chair of Academic Board. Course reviews are generally undertaken in the context of a full School review. (As further described in the Course Review Policy )
  34. Course Review: Chair of Academic Board Report - This is the report compiled by the Chair of Academic Board, on behalf of the Board, based on the Report of the Review Panel, responses and discussion at Programs Committee.
  35. Course Review Implementation Report - This is a report provided to Academic Board one year after agreement of the Chair of Academic Board Report by the Academic Board.
  36. Course Review Submission - In the fifth year of the School Review cycle a Course Review Submission is prepared by the Head of School in consultation with the School Board, Executive Dean and PQR. In the case of combined and double degrees the Head of School will also consult with any other relevant Schools. A Course Review Submission will contain information derived from the Course Summary Report, including course performance, viability, quality and relevance to the School and to the University. (As further described in the Course Review Submission Guidelines )
  37. Course Review Panel
    1. Is a Panel with a senior academic of the University as its Chair. It shall have a minimum membership of three (3) plus the Chair. The Panel will normally have members representing appropriate disciplinary expertise, stakeholder interest and knowledge of quality review processes. The Panel will normally:
      • be relatively small (three members plus the Chair);
      • be chaired by a senior member of academic staff from this University;
      • include external senior academic/s providing appropriate disciplinary representation;
      • include industry representation;
      • include an internal or external member who has undergone training in quality review processes.
  38. Course Review Panel Report - This is the report compiled by the Chair of the Course Review Panel in consultation with the members of the Panel.
  39. Course Summary Report - The Course Summary Report is part of the course review process. It is a report compiled in the fifth year of the process by the Course Coordinator. It is a summary of information provided in the Annual Course Reports and forms part of the Course Review Submission. (As further described in the Course Report - Course Coordinator's Procedures )
  40. Credit - is the value assigned for the recognition of equivalence in content and learning outcomes between different types of learning and/or qualifications. Credit reduces the amount of learning required to achieve a qualification (AQF 2013, p. 94);
  41. Credit Transfer - is a process that provides students with agreed and consistent credit outcomes for components of a qualification based on identified equivalence in content and learning outcomes between matched qualifications (AQF 2013, p. 94);
  42. Credit Value - The number of points awarded for the completion of a study package.
  43. Discipline - This is defined as a broad field in the ASCEDField of Study e.g. Natural and Physical Sciences.
  44. Diverse student profile - Student diversity refers to the variance in the student population regarding: type of enrolment (e.g. full-time, part-time, international, study abroad), location (e.g. internal, external, mixedmode), age, sex, employment status, cultural background, first language, socio-economic status, educational background (e.g. School/College leaver, mature age student).
  45. Examination - The formally invigilated examination held at the end of a study period.
  46. Exemption (Unit Substitution) - Where previous studies and/or subsequent work experience are sufficient that the student has acquired the level of knowledge expected from the study of the unit a unit substitution may be made. This means a student does not need to complete the unit as part of the award, but they must choose a replacement unit in consultation with the School/College. This is usually applied for on an individual basis.
  47. Experiential learning - Experiential learning is the process of making meaning from direct experience and involves a direct encounter with the phenomenon being studied.
  48. External Expert - The External Expert is a person appointed by the Chair of Academic Board to conduct course reviews in a school. Where a course under review is made up of a number of discipline areas the Chair may appoint more than one expert. (As further described in the Course Review Policy )
  49. Field of Study
    1. defined as a specific field in the ASCED Field of Study; area of specialisation e.g.
      • Mathematical Sciences. An award title would normally be at this level of detail.
    2. detailed field in the ASCED Field of Study; more specific area of specialisation e.g.
      • Mathematics.
  50. First year student - A first year student is a student in their first year of study at University. They may enrol as a beginning student mid-year or may transfer with advanced standing from another institution into, typically, the second year of a course.
  51. Flexible learning
    1. Flexible learning includes all aspects of the provision of education, involves all sectors of the University both academic and administrative, and essentially aims to offer students appropriate choices in what, where and how they learn. As such, flexible learning describes both a philosophy of education and a set of systems and structures by which education is delivered and administered.
    2. Flexible learning at Southern Cross University is understood to encompass three domains:
      • Pedagogy: which demonstrates a commitment to student centred learning and the development of lifelong learning skills;
      • Methods of delivery: which encompass choices amongst face to face, print, online and other emerging technologies;
      • Administrative and learning support: systems and structures that support flexible learning pedagogies and methods of delivery.
  52. Formal Learning - is the learning that takes place through a structured program of learning that leads to the full or partial achievement of an officially accredited qualification' (AQF, 2013, p.95);
  53. Fraud - A form of cheating that includes, but is not limited to creating false data sets, falsifying data from experiments, clinics, surveys, field trips or other investigations.
  54. Full Resource Statement
    1. The Full Resource Statement is written by the School/College and submitted to the Executive Dean.
    2. The Executive Dean will then forward the recommended Full Resource Statement to the DVC who will inform the relevant parties of their assessment and decision regarding economic viability of the proposal. The Full Resource Statement must be signed off by the University Librarian*, Director of IT* and the Director of Student Services* before being forwarded by the School/College. (*or their delegate). The Full Resource Statement must be submitted at the same time as the Course Accreditation Submission or the Course Change Submission. Templates are provided by the Finance Section for guidance. Financial viability of proposed courses and an acceptable return on investment must be planned and demonstrated.
  55. Grade Point Average (GPA)
    1. The Grade Point Average (GPA) is a simple numerical index which summarises a student's academic performance in a course in a single study period or over the duration of the student's enrolment in the course. The GPA is recorded on a student's Statement of Academic Record/Transcript and Notification of Assessment. The GPA is calculated as:
      • Sum of (Grade Point x Credit Points) / Sum of (Credit Points)
    2. Grade points are assigned to graded units where High Distinction = 7, Distinction = 6, Credit = 5, Pass = 4, Terminating Pass = 3, Fail = 0. Non-graded units, interim notations and advanced standing are not included in grade point average calculations.
  56. Individual or unstructured credit transfer - Individual students are required to negotiate credit on a case-by-case basis, through the School/College. This arrangement is usually initiated by the student. Decisions are based either on credit precedents or on an exercise of mapping the outcomes of previous studies or RPL the student has undertaken against the higher education course to which the student is applying to determine what has already been covered in that prior study or RPL. (Giving Credit Where Credit is Due, DEST, 2006.) For SCU units the units will have a grade recorded which will be counted towards a GPA.
  57. Informal Learning - is gained through work, social, family, hobby or leisure activities and experiences. Unlike formal or non-formal learning, informal learning is not organised or externally structured in terms of objectives, time or learning support' (AQF, 2013, p.96);
  58. Information literacy - Information literacy is an understanding and set of abilities enabling individuals to:
    1. recognise when information is needed and have the capacity to locate, evaluate, an use effectively the needed information. (American Library Association, 1989)
  59. Initial Resource Statement - The Initial Resource Statement is written by the School/College and submitted to the Executive Dean. The Executive Dean will then forward the recommended Initial Resource Statement to the DVC who will inform the relevant parties of their assessment and decision regarding economic viability of the proposal. The Initial Resource Statement must be signed off by the University Librarian*, Director of IT* and the Director of Student Services* before being forwarded by the School/College. (* or their delegate). The Initial Resource Statement must be submitted at the same time as the New Course Concept Proposal. Templates are provided by the Finance Section for guidance. Financial viability of proposed courses and an acceptable return on investment must be planned and demonstrated.
  60. Integrated cross-sector award - These arrangements involve designing new or modifying existing qualifications to create an integrated or defined qualification pathway in which one qualification builds on or is linked directly to the other and in which credit is built into the related awards. Integrated award arrangements involve a collaborative curriculum development process between both education partners in the arrangement. (Giving Credit Where Credit is Due, DEST, 2006)
  61. Learning package - Irrespective of mode of delivery, a learning package will normally comprise a body of content relevant to the unit objectives (whether delivered by lectures, by printed learning materials or online), some facilitated interaction (whether face-to-face, online or other means), support and feedback on student progress and an appropriately supported assessment program.
  62. Lifelong learning - This Policy gives expression to the concept of lifelong learning, described in the list of attributes which graduates of Southern Cross University are expected to develop during their programs of study as the ability to be responsive to change, to be reflective in practice and to be information literate in order to update one's knowledge through independent and self-directed learning.
  63. Major
    1. A major will consist of 8 units and will be one of the following two types — Specialist (S) and University-wide (U).
    2. Specialist major:
      • comprises 8 units to be chosen from a maximum of 12
      • builds on the core, ie. pre-requisites come from the core
      • may enable pathways through the major through requisites contained within the major
      • does not include independent studies units
      • only includes viable units
      • is built by the specialist School/College, College or Department to suit the needs of the specialist degree that it is part of 15
      • can include units from other School/Colleges, Colleges or Departments, with consultation
      • will be named and approved by Academic Board.
    3. A university-wide major:
      • comprises 8 units to be chosen from a maximum of 14
      • is self-contained and does not require entry pre-requisites although pathways through the major can be constructed through requisites (if required) contained within the major
      • does not include independent studies units
      • only includes viable units
      • exists independently of a specific award
      • can be constructed by a School/College, college or department or combination of such but one School/College, college or department must be responsible for the approval and management of the major
      • will be the same regardless of the degree undertaken
      • will be approved by academic board as available across the university for inclusion in a range of UG degrees
      • university-wide majors will be listed in the student handbook.
  64. National Code - National Code of Practice for Registration Authorities and Providers of Education and Training to Overseas Students 2007.
  65. Nested Qualifications - are qualifications that include articulated arrangements from a lower level qualification into a higher level qualification to enable multiple entry and exit points' (AQF, 2013, p.98);
  66. New Course Concept Proposal
    1. Prior to developing a New Course Concept Proposal the proposer will check that the course is listed on the SCU Academic Plan.
    2. At least one teaching period (15 weeks) before the Course Accreditation Submission is put forward by School/College, and begins its approval process, the School/College Board must submit the New Course Concept Proposal to the DVC. The New Course Concept Proposal shall include the following information:
      • details of the course, e.g. nomenclature, School/College etc.
      • rationale for introducing the new course
      • how the course fits with the strategic directions of the University
      • how the course fits with the current Academic Plan
      • information for advance marketing
      • proposed Course Development Team
      • approval and implementation timetable
      • appropriate approvals.
    3. The New Course Concept Proposal is forwarded to the Secretary of Academic Board by the DVC for noting by Programs Committee.
    4. Please also refer to the New Course Accreditation Timeline for Approval, Publications and Implementation deadlines for Course Concept and Course Accreditation.
  67. Non Formal Learning - refers to learning that takes place through a structured program of learning but does not lead to an officially accredited qualification' (AQF, 2013, p. 98);
  68. Peer Review - Peer review is a systematic process whereby academics review and improve teaching, curriculum and assessment practices. It is an iterative collegial process that aims to increase visibility and accountability in decision-making about teaching and student learning.
  69. Placement - A type of community integrated learning that requires the student to be situated in a community setting outside of the University. This is most often termed Work Integrated Learning and can take the form of internship, practicum, industry placement and fieldwork.
  70. Plagiarism - Using the work of others without due acknowledgement, fraudulently, deliberately or inadvertently, and claiming it as one's own for academic or other purposes. See also definitions in Rule 3 , Section17.
  71. Prize - A prize is a reward provided to a student in recognition of the completion of a distinguished piece of work.
  72. Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) - 'is an assessment process that involves assessment of relevant prior learning (including formal, informal and non-formal learning) (National Quality Council Training Packages Glossary) ' (AQF, 2013, p.99);
  73. School and School Board - Throughout the Policy reference is made to the School, Head of School and School Board. In all instances, unless specified otherwise, this also refers to the College, Director of College and College Board.
  74. School Review - The School Review is a review of all aspects of the operations of a School. It is conducted once every five years and is part of a Schedule of School Reviews approved by the Deputy Vice Chancellor. Unit and annual course reports are part of the course review process which is a subset of the School Review. (As further described in the Course Review Policy )
  75. Secretary of Course Review - The Secretary of a Course Review will be appointed by the DVC in consultation with the Head of School and will assist the School and the External Expert in the conduct of the Course Review. (As further described in the Course Review Policy )
  76. Service Learning - Service Learning is a form of Community Engaged Learning that integrates meaningful community service with course based learning experiences, for the greater community good and the development of global citizenship skills.
  77. Specialisation - Within postgraduate awards, a specialisation may be indicated. A specialisation:
    1. will be comprised of a minimum of four (4) units and normally a maximum of eight (8) units;
    2. will build upon core units in the award, i.e. pre-requisites come from within the award;
    3. will be built by the School or College to suit the needs of the award of which it is a part;
    4. can include units from other Schools or Colleges with consultation;
    5. will be named and approved by Academic Board; and
    6. be named on the award's testamur.
  78. Specified credit - Granted for previous completion of equivalent studies undertaken at SCU or another institution. The credit given will be for a specific unit. For SCU units the units will have a grade recorded which will be counted towards a GPA. This is applied for on an individual basis.
  79. Specified Units - are credited where prior learning is assessed as meeting the learning outcomes of a specific SCU unit;
  80. Strong Caution - A strong caution is similar to a caution in content and is issued to a student who has committed academic misconduct 'deliberately' in a 'minor' case. In addition a strong caution is put in writing to the student with a copy to the Academic Standards Officer.
  81. Structured credit transfer - Involves participating institutions determining agreed amounts of credit from a prior qualification to a higher education qualification in advance, with universal application to all students who have undertaken the prior qualification. In this case, decisions are either based on curriculum or content mapping to determine equivalences of learning outcomes between the prior qualification and the higher education qualification or on general institutional policies that specify amounts of credit for particular levels or award.
  82. Student - Unless specified to the contrary in specific chapters referred to in this Policy, 'Student' means a person enrolled as a candidate in a course leading to an accredited award of the University, or in units which do not lead to an accredited award of the university (Rule 1, Section 1, clause (1)x - Examination).
  83. Student-centred learning - Student-centred learning means 'ways of thinking and learning that emphasize student responsibility and activity in learning rather than what the teachers are doing. Essentially SCL has student responsibility and activity at its heart, in contrast to a strong emphasis on teacher control and coverage of academic content in much conventional, didactic teaching.' (Cannon and Newble, 2000)
  84. Student history - This is the internal record of grades and advanced standing awarded to a specific student by the University.
  85. Test - A test is a formative or summative exercise used principally to determine the skills acquired by students in a part of the curriculum.
  86. Testamur - The document awarded to a student upon graduation which includes the name of the award and any accredited majors listed.
  87. Transcript - This is the final record of grades and advanced standing awarded to a specific student by the University.
  88. Unit - This is a discrete component of a course; units are identified by a title and code number, and typically require 130-150 hours of dedicated study time.
  89. Unit Performance Reports -
    1. Individual Unit Performance Report
      • This MIS report provides an overall snapshot across all locations of how a particular unit is performing in the chosen year, study period and location with respect to unit status (including attrition), grade distribution and overall student satisfaction including comparative data.
    2. Individual Unit Performance (Trend Analysis) Report
      • This MIS report provides a trend analysis of a chosen unit to see how it has performed over time (in the past offerings) compared against the university mean for each measure. Data are represented to track performance over time by unit Status, grade results and overall satisfaction mean Unit Report
    3. A Unit Report is completed by the Unit Assessor at the end of each teaching period in which the unit has been offered. The report is provided no later than three weeks into the following teaching period to the relevant Course Coordinator. The Unit Reports provide information for the annual course report. (As further described in the Unit Report Template)
  90. Unit Statement - The Unit Statement describes the context, aims, objectives, content, assessment and materials requirements for a unit. It is provided to a student at the commencement of the teaching period in which the unit is being offered. It must be in accordance with University policy and Rules.
  91. Unspecified Credit Points are granted where prior learning in an application for advanced standing is assessed as meeting the learning outcomes of elective units or comprising learning that supports the integrity of the award. Such credit may recognise that not all courses are comprehensive in their coverage of a field or discipline, and that learning acquired in other settings and contexts supports the integrity of the award for which credit is granted.;
  92. Work Integrated Learning - Work integrated learning is a form of Community Engaged Learning that integrates theoretical learning with its application in the workplace for the development of defined industry and professional skills and knowledge.